CHIPS Act funding needed to boost Ohio manufacturing industry


Ryan Augsburger is president of The Ohio Manufacturers’ Association, which represents approximately 1,500 manufacturers statewide.

More than ever, Ohioans are seeing how issues with our supply chains affect everyday life. From shipping delays to product shortages, we’re experiencing the impact caused by uncertain international trade routes and unreliable supplies of vital components produced abroad. Nowhere is this clearer than in the semiconductor industry.

Semiconductors are an essential component of all sorts of everyday products, from computers to cars to medical equipment to LED bulbs. That means a shortage of semiconductors creates challenges across the manufacturing sector, holding up essential goods and causing long delays for American consumers.

More:The microchip shortage is not going away soon, and it’s affecting way more than cars

And because most advanced semiconductors are produced in Asia, snarled international supply chains make it difficult for manufacturers in the United States to reliably access the chips they need.

We’re already seeing some companies address this challenge by committing to expand US chip production. Earlier this year, Intel announced plans to invest $20 billion in leading-edge chip factories in Ohio.

Ryan Augsburger is president of The Ohio Manufacturers' Association, which represents approximately 1,500 manufacturers statewide.  Learn more at ohiomfg.com.

The project will boost production of advanced semiconductors, create thousands of jobs, and help smooth supply chains, all while strengthening our economy and putting the United States in a stronger position to compete with China and its state-propped industry.

More:How to submit guest opinion columns to the Columbus Dispatch

That’s an important start — but to address this issue comprehensively, we will need to do more. Expanding domestic chip production requires overcoming incredibly high barriers, from enormous startup costs to regulatory burdens that are difficult for manufacturers to bear.

Leave a Comment

Your email address will not be published.